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All Courses Winter 2019

Undergraduate Courses

GER 102 First Year German (5 credits)
CRN: 23296, 23297, 23298, 23299, 23300, 26630
This series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture: you will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

SWED 102 First Year Swedish (5 credits) Mier-Cruz
CRN: 26404. Thorough grammatical foundation in idiomatic Swedish with emphasis on both reading and speaking.

GER 202 Second Year German  (4 Credits)
CRN: 23301, 23302, 23303
This is the fifth quarter of a two-year sequence designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In German 202, you will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with engaging cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond. As we have done in the 100 series, we will use as much German as possible right from the start and we will help you to do the same. Your active participation will quickly yield results!

SWED 202 Second Year Swedish (4 credits) Mier-Cruz
CRN: 26405. Review of grammar, composition, and conversation. Readings from contemporary texts in Swedish.

GER 220M/SCAN 220M From Kierkegaard to Kafka (4 credits)
Tuesday/Thursday 8:30-9:50 a.m. / Michael Stern
CRN: 26687/26688; taught in English.  Fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. This course explores the connection between German and Scandinavian culture through the lens of an existential tradition expressed in philosophy, literature, drama, visual arts, and cinema. Course includes texts written by Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Franz Kafka, Martin Heidegger, Karin Boye, and Per Lagerkvist. Students will also see film by Ingmar Bergman and view paintings by various artists from Germany and Scandinavia.

GER 222 Voices of Dissent in Germany: The Holocaust and its Representations (4 credits)
Monday/Wednesday 12:00-1:20 p.m. plus Friday discussion / Matthias Vogel
CRN: 23305 + Discussion; taught in English. This course is a double dipper: it satisfies one Arts and Letters, and one Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance requirement. The Holocaust (sometimes called “the Shoah”) is the murder, during World War II, of approximately six million Jews and very large numbers of other “enemies” of the Nazi regime in Europe at the hands of the National Socialists. The course introduces questions surrounding the representation of these events in various forms. For example, how can one adequately represent this scale of violence and trauma? How can one understand and explain such events? What are the advantages and disadvantages of various types of representation? We will read a historical overview, a personal memoir from Auschwitz, fiction based on concentration camp experience, and some poems. We will consider also films and hear some music written to commemorate these terrible events. We will learn about German and Jewish history, about racism and violence, about human strengths and weaknesses, and about ideologies that produce violent scapegoating mechanisms. Lectures are supplemented by weekly discussion sections.

GER 250 Culture of Money (4 credits)
Monday/Wednesday 2:00-3:50 p.m. / Martin Klebes
CRN: 23310; taught in English. Fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. This course presents a concise intellectual history of German-speaking culture from the 16th century to the 19th century that puts a primary focus on economic thinking. Through a combination of broader historical readings, close readings of literary and philosophical texts, and an analysis of visual art and music, we will trace development of religion, science, literature, art, and philosophy during this time. How do these fields reflect the transformation of economic and social values from the Reformation through the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and the Industrial Revolution? Authors and artists to be investigated include Luther, Dürer, Lessing, Kant, Goethe, Chamisso, Keller, and Marx. This course assumes no prior knowledge of German, but you will learn about (and learn to pronounce!) a few key German words and phrases that are central to our reading.

GER 312 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits)
Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:00-9:50 a.m. / Lisa Hoeller
CRN: 23311.  This course satisfies one Arts and Letters requirement.  Extensive practice in speaking and writing German, and complex grammatical structures in writing.

SCAN 317 Directors, Movements, and Manifestos: The Invention of Youth (4 credits)
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:20 p.m. / Michael Stern
CRN: 26693; taught in English. This course satisfies the International Cultures (IC) requirement. This course also fulfills a Cinema Studies Core B requirement. In this course, we will explore Scandinavian cinematic representations of youthful figures and of adults who cannot escape their youth. Our purpose is to interrogate the relationship between how cinema helps to create enduring images of these figures, and how cinema, as mass commercial culture is shaped by the emergence of the young consumer. In order to conduct our survey, we have purposely avoided selecting films from the archives of the “Nordic film course” as such. Instead, we selected a variety of films from the last three decades that either have enjoyed broad international circulation or have been popular in Scandinavia itself. In this way, we can explore the international dimensions of the interest in youth culture while at the same time we can discuss how the construction of childhood and of “the teenager” in popular culture inflects both our own experiences and those of young people in Scandinavia.

SCAN 343 Norse Mythology (4 credits)
Monday/Wednesday 12:00-1:20 p.m. / Gantt Gurley
CRN: 26685; taught in English.  Satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. This course also fulfills Folklore and Public Culture degree requirements. This course will be a critical evaluation of the religious beliefs in Scandinavia from prehistory through the Viking Age. We will examine very thoroughly three mythological texts: The Edda, The Prose Edda, and Ynglinga Saga. To facilitate our study of the primary sources of Norse mythology we will make use of both Indo-European data and Scandinavian folklore and belief. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to broaden their understanding of the primary materials by introducing many of the scholarly debates and trends of the field.

SCAN 354 Genres in Scandinavian Literature: Crime Fiction (4 credits)
Tuesday/Thursday 4:00-5:20 p.m. / Benjamin Mier-Cruz
CRN: 26691; taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. Scandinavian crime fiction is a worldwide phenomenon that has sparked endless film and television adaptations and original series across the globe. It is curious that the Nordic region, often considered to be utopian, is home to such violent and provocative page-turning material. The fictional representations of crime, detective work, legal proceedings, and punishment in Nordic noir are as thrilling as they are critical of society. Indeed, blockbuster series like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo trilogy and Kurt Wallander mysteries show that beneath the glossy surface of Nordic exceptionalism lies a dark underworld of corruption, exploitation, and violence. In this course, we will explore how crime fiction contributes to issues concerning democracy, class, psychology, race, xenophobia, migration, gender, and sexuality. We will study Nordic novels, film, television series, and crime fiction subgenres, including the detective novel, the police procedural, and the thriller. Secondary texts will cover the genre, cultural studies, feminist and narrative theory.

GER 355 German Cinema: Weimar Cinema and Its Legacies (4 credits)
Monday/Wednesday 10:00-11:50 a.m. / Kenneth Calhoon
CRN: 26675; taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. This course also fulfills a Cinema Studies Core C requirement. German cinema after the First World War enjoyed a golden age, garnering international acclaim for both its technical and artistic innovation. Films deemed “Expressionist,” such as Robert Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and F. W. Murnau’s Nosferatu, are perhaps the most recognizable, but they represent only one stylistic subset of the films produced during the Weimar Republic (1919-1933). The rise of National Socialism and the pull of Hollywood combined to prompt a large-scale migration of filmmaking talent to the United States. Once in America, Austrian-born Wilhelm “Billy” Wilder set a course for both film noir (Sunset Boulevard, Double Indemnity) and comedy (The Seven-Year Itch, Some Like it Hot), and cinematographer Karl Freund (Caligari, Metropolis) went on to photograph a range of productions from Dracula to I Love Lucy. These are but two of the many figures to be explored in a course designed to trace key strains of American cinematic culture back to early twentieth-century Germany. The course will proceed along several key tangents, including (1) the issue of exile and the uncanniness of films made by filmmakers not fully “at home” in the US, (2) the abiding presence of early German cinema in American films made well after the acme of émigré filmmaking, and (3) the migration of certain trends from Hollywood through the French and German new waves and back again.

GER 361 Literary Movements: die Wiener Moderne (4 credits)
Tuesday/Thursday 10:00-11:20 a.m. / Susan Anderson
CRN: 26683; taught in German. Fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement.
Viennese modernism (“die Wiener Moderne”) refers to the period from around 1890 – shortly after WWI. It signifies a period of widely influential innovation for German-speaking literature and culture. Vienna was the center for new impulses in art, literature, music, architecture, music, philosophy, and scientific thought. We will discuss works by writers and artists who introduced new ways of thinking about sex, love, death, anxiety, desire, aesthetics, language, and social conventions. In addition to familiarizing you with this period, the goal of the course is to sharpen your sensibilities as readers by calling attention to formal aspects of literature and art, such as narrative perspective, language, and imagery. You will increase your proficiency in German by reading and discussing texts in German and writing comments, tests, and papers in German. The class will be conducted in German, although some background reading will be in English.

GER 399 Special Studies: Food Studies (4 credits)
Tuesday/Thursday 5:00-6:50 p.m. / Matthias Vogel
CRN: 27625; taught in English and German. Knowledge of German is not required.  Food and life experiences are inextricably linked. Through interdisciplinary readings, lectures, films, and discussions, this comparative course will examine the relationship between food and identity in literature, culture, and business. We will examine the ways in which German literature uses food to represent and understand the human experience. We will discuss the various symbolic functions of food associated with images of cooking, eating, drinking, and feasting as presented in literary works and popular culture. Class discussion will be supplemented by the viewing of films about food and eating, and by the reading of secondary-critical material that will help us to frame our discussions of food in literature while expanding toward contemporary food issues (sustainability, food security, ethnicity, national identity). The course will include dinners, exploration of wine and beer in German culture, and guest lectures.

GER 401 Research (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23314

SCAN 401 Research (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 26123

GER 403 Thesis (1-12 credits) Staff CRN: 23315

SCAN 403 Thesis (1-12 credits) Staff CRN: 26124

GER 405 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23316

SCAN 405 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 26125

SWED 405 Reading (1-16 credits) Mier-Cruz
CRN: 26406

GER 407 Seminar:  Cynicism as Code: Enlightenment and Anti-Enlightenment Ideologies (4 credits) Monday/Wednesday 2:00-3:20 p.m. / Dorothee Ostmeier
CRN: 26694; taught in English with readings in German and English. Sloterdijk’s “Critique of the Cynical Mind” (1983) cuts harshly through the pre-dispositions of many disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences in order to unleash critical sensibilities towards Enlightenment and Anti-Enlightenment ideologies of identity and rationality. Cynicism negotiates the thresholds between ideologies and systems of thought, religions, political, psychological and egocentrically driven actions. Sloterdijk’s critique was published only one year before Foucault’s investigation of cynicism (1984). We will read relevant passages by Sloterdijk and Foucault, and ask how they might inform our engagements with Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment works. Further discussions might include texts by Luther, Lessing, Goethe, Hoffmann, Heine, Nietzsche, Benn, Brecht, Expressionist and Dadaist art. Students will choose their own individual area of research, give one in-class presentation, and complete a final research paper or media project. This class will be taught in English with readings in German and English (cross-listed with Folklore and Public Culture).

GER 409
Practicum (1-4 credits) Staff CRN: 23318

GER 409 Practicum German Teaching (1-3 credits)
Friday 12:00-1:50 p.m. / Dorothee Ostmeier
CRN: 26672. Interested in a fun skill-building internship for the opportunity to use your German language skills? In collaboration with Eugene schools, the Department of German and Scandinavian is excited to offer a German-teaching internship program for dedicated undergraduate majors or minors in German who enjoy working with children and possess a high proficiency in the language. GER 409 students employ new and fun-driven teaching approaches in settings from pre-school through sixth grade levels, and will act as ambassadors for GERSCAN working towards our mission of promoting global citizenship across all curriculums. The program will run through both Winter and Spring terms of 2019. In order to prepare for the assignment, students will receive preparatory training during the Winter Term, followed by 4-5 weeks of teaching during Spring Term, and around the sixth week, students will prepare a report about their teaching experiences.
All interested applicants should submit a brief resume and a short statement (1-2 pages) explaining your interest in this project and your qualifications. This course counts towards the German Major as a language course and/or SLAT certificate. Priority applications are due to Dorothee Ostmeier (ostmeier@uoregon.edu) by Friday, November 9th, 2018.

SCAN 409 Practicum (1-3 credits) Staff CRN: 26127

GER 412 Advanced Language Training (4 credits)
Monday/Wednesday 8:30-9:50 a.m. / Martin Klebes
CRN: 23320. Constant practice in speaking and writing with emphasis on complex syntactic structures as well as idiomatic nuances in German writing.

GER 471 German for Reading Knowledge II (4 credits)
Tuesday/Thursday 8:30-9:50 a.m. / Corinne Bayerl
CRN: 23321; taught in English in an intensive workshop approach. Intensive practice in grammar; reading texts in the student’s own field. Primarily for graduate students in other disciplines; recommended for students who want extra training in translation.

Graduate Courses

GER 503 Thesis (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23322

GER 507 Seminar:  Cynicism as Code: Enlightenment and Anti-Enlightenment Ideologies (4 credits) Monday/Wednesday 2:00-3:20 p.m. / Dorothee Ostmeier
CRN: 26695; taught in English with readings in German and English. Sloterdijk’s “Critique of the Cynical Mind” (1983) cuts harshly through the pre-dispositions of many disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences in order to unleash critical sensibilities towards Enlightenment and Anti-Enlightenment ideologies of identity and rationality. Cynicism negotiates the thresholds between ideologies and systems of thought, religions, political, psychological and egocentrically driven actions. Sloterdijk’s critique was published only one year before Foucault’s investigation of cynicism (1984). We will read relevant passages by Sloterdijk and Foucault, and ask how they might inform our engagements with Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment works. Further discussions might include texts by Luther, Lessing, Goethe, Hoffmann, Heine, Nietzsche, Benn, Brecht, Expressionist and Dadaist art. Students will choose their own individual area of research, give one in-class presentation, and complete a final research paper or media project. This class will be taught in English with readings in German and English (cross-listed with Folklore and Public Culture).

GER 571 German for Reading Knowledge II (4 credits)
Tuesday/Thursday 8:30-9:50 a.m. / Corinne Bayerl
CRN: 23324; taught in English in an intensive workshop approach. Intensive practice in grammar; reading texts in the student’s own field. Primarily for graduate students in other disciplines; recommended for students who want extra training in translation.

GER 601 Research (1-6 credits) Staff CRN: 23325

GER 603 Dissertation (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23328

GER 605 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23329

SCAN 605 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 26129

GER 608 College Translation Study (1-2 credits) Susan Anderson
CRN: 27713. Class meets on three Fridays: January 25, February 15, and March 8.

GER 609 Practicum (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23330

GER 609 Practicum Language Teaching (1-16 credits) Matthias Vogel CRN: 23331

SCAN 609 Practicum (1-16 credits) STAFF CRN: 26130

GER 625 Translations-Transformations (4 credits)
Tuesday/Thursday 4:00-5:20 p.m. / Susan Anderson
CRN: 26673.

 

 



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