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All Courses Winter 2018

Undergraduate Courses

GER 102 First Year German (5 credits)
CRN: 23199, 23200, 23201, 23202, 23203
This series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture: you will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

SWED 102 First Year Swedish (5 credits) Mier-Cruz
CRN: 26248. Thorough grammatical foundation in idiomatic Swedish with emphasis on both reading and speaking.

GER 202 Second Year German  (4 Credits)
CRN: 23205, 23206, 23207, 23208
This is the fifth quarter of a two-year sequence designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In German 202, you will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with engaging cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond. As we have done in the 100 series, we will use as much German as possible right from the start and we will help you to do the same. Your active participation will quickly yield results!

SWED 202 Second Year Swedish (4 credits) Mier-Cruz
CRN: 26249. Review of grammar, composition, and conversation. Readings from contemporary texts in Swedish.

GER 222 Voices of Dissent in Germany (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 23209 + Discussion; Taught in English. This course is a double dipper: it satisfies one Arts and Letters, and one Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance requirement. This course offers an introduction to the background, events, and representations of the Holocaust. The Holocaust is the murder of approximately six million Jews and also unbearably large numbers of Sinti and Roma, homosexuals, communists, and other “enemies” of the Nazi regime in Europe at the hands of the National Socialists, along with those who aided them.  We examine not only what happened, but how and why, and we inquire especially about the possibilities and limits of the representation of these events in various forms: historical prose, memoir, poetry, fiction, and film. Lectures will be supplemented by weekly discussion sections.

GER 250 Culture of Money (4 credits) Klebes
CRN: 23214; Taught in English. Fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. This course presents a concise intellectual history of German-speaking culture from the 16th century to the 19th century that puts a primary focus on economic thinking. Through a combination of broader historical readings, close readings of literary and philosophical texts, and an analysis of visual art and music, we will trace development of religion, science, literature, art, and philosophy during this time. How do these fields reflect the transformation of economic and social values from the Reformation through the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and the Industrial Revolution? Authors and artists to be investigated include Luther, Dürer, Lessing, Kant, Goethe, Chamisso, Keller, and Marx.

GER 312 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits)
CRN: 23215.  This course satisfies one Arts and Letters requirement.  Extensive practice in speaking and writing German, and complex grammatical structures in writing.

GER 341 Introduction to German Culture and Society (4 credits) Mathas
CRN: 26668; Taught in German. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement. This course will cover a broad range of significant literary, historical, and philosophical texts that will provide insights into German cultural developments over the past 200 years. Topics will cover literary periods such as Romanticism, Realism, and Expression; historical phenomena, such as bourgeois emancipation; the crisis of modernization; nationalism; German unification; and events connected to WWI and II. Iconic cultural representatives will include Marx, Freud, Nietzsche, Mann, Kafka, and many others.

SCAN 344 Medieval Heroes and Monsters (4 credits) Gurley
CRN: 26875; Taught in English.  This course satisfies the International Cultures (IC) requirement. Medieval Germanic tradition has given Western literature some of its most provocative and productive heroes. These figures populate the literary landscape of the North as some of the most sophisticated expressions of human ideals. In this course, students will look not only at the ever changing and refining display of heroes, but also at their unsung counterparts: the monsters they encounter, the monsters they are haunted by, and the monsters they become. Considering both figures as expressions of cultural aesthetics and prohibition, we will trace the evolution of heroics and monstrosity from early narrative poetry to the heyday of the Skaldic Sagas and then into the twilight of saga production where continental and courtly notions of heroism start to displace the innovative, indigenous models.

SCAN 351 Periods in Scandinavian Literature: Brown Eyed Girl (4 credits) Mier-Cruz
CRN: 26684; Taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement. This course examines intersectional areas of diversity—including ethnicity, class, race, and gender—and how these have been historically challenged by radical nationalism, anti-Islam protesters, and neo-Nazis. The course explores the recent history of immigration in these countries, the current activism and political systems shaping and resisting a diverse society, and the media, literature, and scholarship that address these issues in polarizing ways. Special attention is given to literary and cinematic depictions of non-conforming and less tolerated identities, bodies, and beliefs.

GER 356 German Fairy Tales (4 credits) Ostmeier
CRN: 26666; Taught in English. Additional optional discussion in German for interested students. Fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. The study of fairy tales is closely linked to controversial debates about the complex aesthetic, philosophical and social connotations of fantasy and the imaginary. We will examine the transitions from magic to uncanny, surrealist, and fantasy tales in texts from Romanticism, to visual cultures of the 21st century, and rethink and refashion our perceptions of reality by challenging the fluid borders between various fictive realities.

GER 401 Research (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23219

SCAN 401 Research (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 25978

GER 403 Thesis (1-12 credits) Staff CRN: 23220

SCAN 403 Thesis (1-12 credits) Staff CRN: 25979

GER 405 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23221

SCAN 405 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 25980

SWED 405 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 26250

SCAN 407 Seminar: Kierkegaard Poetic (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 26688; Taught in English. In this course, students will read selected texts from Kierkegaard’s aesthetic writings with an eye trained on his employment of irony. We will begin by looking at some ancient texts depicting Socrates and then explore Kierkegaard’s understanding of these texts. Then we will read and discuss several of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous works, all of which employ irony as both a rhetorical and epistemological strategy. In this way, we can better understand how Kierkegaard’s philosophical strategy conveyed a sense of the reader thinking into the text in a manner that suggests praxis, and how his work prefigures much of 20th century existentialist thought.

GER 409 Practicum (1-4 credits) Staff CRN: 23223

GER 409 Practicum German Teaching (1-3 credits) Vogel
CRN: 23224. An internship program teaching German to pre-school, elementary, or middle school students within Eugene, Oregon schools. This program aims to enrich children up to the sixth-grade level, using new and fun-driven teaching approaches. The department can offer this exciting opportunity to eight dedicated undergraduate majors or minors in German, who enjoy working with children and possess a high proficiency in the language. The program runs through both winter and spring term 2018. In order to prepare for the assignment, students will receive preparatory training during the winter term, followed by 4-5 weeks of teaching during the spring term. Around the sixth week, students will prepare a report about their teaching experiences. If interested, please submit a brief resume and short statement explaining your interest in this project and your qualifications to Matthias Vogel via email at matvogel@uoregon.edu

SCAN 409 Practicum (1-3 credits) Staff CRN: 25981

GER 410 Experimental Course: Contemporary Austrian Prose (4 credits) Boos
CRN: 26685; taught in English. What is the relationship between nationalism, patriotism, and national identity? Is “Heimat” a political construct, a utopian vision, or simply a nostalgic concession to provincialism? To what degree is our sense of belonging imposed by historical exigencies, disrupted by repressed memories, and informed by cultural clichés? Is it possible to find a new “Heimat” away from one’s home? These deeply contemporary questions will inform our discussion of Austrian prose works by Bachmann, Bernhard, Handke, Jelinek, Menasse, Musil, Schneider, and Winkler. Topics include pastoralism, anti-Heimat-Literatur, the Nazi past, Catholicism, Nestbeschutzer, traditionalism, tourism, and more.

GER 412 Advanced Language Training (4 credits) Bayerl
CRN: 23225. Constant practice in speaking and writing with emphasis on complex syntactic structures as well as idiomatic nuances in German writing.

GER 471 German for Reading Knowledge II (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 23216; Taught in English in an intensive workshop approach. Intensive practice in grammar; reading texts in the student’s own field. Primarily for graduate students in other disciplines; recommended for students who want extra training in translation.

Graduate Courses

GER 503 Thesis (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23226

SCAN 507 Seminar: Kierkegaard Poetic (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 26689; taught in English. In this course, students will read selected texts from Kierkegaard’s aesthetic writings with an eye trained on his employment of irony. We will begin by looking at some ancient texts depicting Socrates and then explore Kierkegaard’s understanding of these texts. Then we will read and discuss several of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous works, all of which employ irony as both a rhetorical and epistemological strategy. In this way, we can better understand how Kierkegaard’s philosophical strategy conveyed a sense of the reader thinking into the text in a manner that suggests praxis, and how his work prefigures much of 20th century existentialist thought.

GER 510 Contemporary Austrian Prose (4 credits) Boos
CRN: 26686; taught in English. What is the relationship between nationalism, patriotism, and national identity? Is “Heimat” a political construct, a utopian vision, or simply a nostalgic concession to provincialism? To what degree is our sense of belonging imposed by historical exigencies, disrupted by repressed memories, and informed by cultural clichés? Is it possible to find a new “Heimat” away from one’s home? These deeply contemporary questions will inform our discussion of Austrian prose works by Bachmann, Bernhard, Handke, Jelinek, Menasse, Musil, Schneider, and Winkler. Topics include pastoralism, anti-Heimat-Literatur, the Nazi past, Catholicism, Nestbeschutzer, traditionalism, tourism, and more.

GER 571 German for Reading Knowledge II (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 26687; taught in English in an intensive workshop approach. Intensive practice in grammar; reading texts in the student’s own field. Primarily for graduate students in other disciplines; recommended for students who want extra training in translation.

GER 601 Research (1-6 credits) Staff CRN: 23228

GER 603 Dissertation (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23229

GER 605 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23230

SCAN 605 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 25982

GER 609 Practicum (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 23233

GER 609 Practicum Language Teaching (1-16 credits) Vogel CRN: 23234

SCAN 609 Practicum (1-16 credits) STAFF CRN: 25984

GER 621 Narrative (4 credits) Librett
CRN: 26683. This course provides a general introduction to narratology from around 1960 until today. After working through a general overview of “classical” narratology and considering some “post-classical” (i.e. contemporary) perspectives, we will focus more narrowly on the questions of temporality and consciousness in narrative, especially as these become thematic in the theory and practice of “stream of consciousness” narrative. The reading of theory will be accompanied by the reading of literary narratives, which will serve throughout as occasions for the application of theory to the activity of interpretation. Class discussions will be held in English. Readings of texts that are not originally written in English will be made available both in the original language and in English.

 

 

 



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