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All Courses Summer and Fall 2018

Fall 2018

Undergraduate Courses:

GER 101 First Year German (5 credits)
CRN: 12719, 12720, 12721, 12722, 12723, 12724. This series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture: you will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

SWED 101 First Year Swedish (5 credits) Mier-Cruz
CRN: 15752. The goal of this course is to introduce Swedish as it is used in everyday contexts, such as talking about yourself, finding your way around, and describing your immediate surroundings. The course will be taught in a communicative way. In-class activities and homework will focus on speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. To succeed in this course, you must actively participate. Class will be conducted primarily, but not exclusively in Swedish. You will be expected to attend class regularly, to prepare for class daily, and speak as much Swedish as possible.

GER 201 2nd Year German (4 credits)
CRN: 12727, 12728, 12729, 12730. Willkommen zurück in Deutsch 201! You have advanced to the fourth quarter of a two-year sequence designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. Congratulations on belonging to this select group! What will we do this year? In German 200 you will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with engaging cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond. As we have done in the 100 series, we will use as much German as possible right from the start and we will help you to do the same. Your active participation will quickly yield results!

SWED 201  Second Year Swedish  (4 credits)  Mier-Cruz
CRN: 15753. The goal of this course is to continue introducing Swedish as it is used in everyday contexts, such as talking about what you like to eat, traveling around Sweden, and describing your immediate surroundings. It will be taught in a communicative way i.e. in-class activities and homework will focus on speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. To succeed in this course, you must actively participate. Class will be conducted primarily, but not exclusively in Swedish. You will be expected to attend class regularly, to prepare for class daily, and speak as much Swedish as possible.

GER 221 Postwar Germany (4 credits) Anderson
CRN: Lecture 12731 + discussion. Taught in English. Satisfies Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement.
This course explores notions about East/West and reunited German culture and society as reflected in a series of narratives, films, and essays. How do these reveal changing ideas in Germany about the connection between the past and present, about authority, rebellion, the desire for fulfillment? The narratives and films address issues that have helped shape the ways Germans think today. They also highlight ongoing debates over concepts of national “unity.” No knowledge of German required; readings and discussions in English.

GER 251 Sexuality (4 credits) Boos
CRN: 12736, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement as well as the Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) requirement.
The history of German Literature and thought has been intertwined with the historical formation of sexual discourse and contemporary debates on sexuality. This course traces the dynamics of sexual relations and policies through the rapidly changing cultural and political landscape of modernity. We will examine pioneering and provocative works from nineteenth to twenty-first century German artists and thinkers to understand how sexual norms and gender roles are (re)negotiated and (re)constructed over time by established institutional practice and social resistance to it. We will become familiar with new forms of representation and interpretation in contexts such as the emergence of psychoanalytic thought, the German avant-garde, the theme of incest, queer film, and social advocacy for homosexual and transgender rights.

SCAN 251 Text and Interpretation: Masks and Ecstatic Experience (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 15471, taught in English. This course satisfies both the Arts and Letters (A&L) and the International Cultures (IC) group.
This class is about stories It is about how we tell them, what they mean to us, and how narrative permeates the very fabric of our understanding of the world. Considering this and remembering that our “universe” of stories includes narratives that we have been told, read, and told ourselves; we can safely say that we are not the authors of our entire sense of the world. This raises several interesting questions about the relationship between and “self” and the “other.” Some of these questions include: Are our stories our own? Who speaks for us? How do I know who I am? What obligation, if any, do I have towards others? To what extent are we determined by history? What is the relationship between speech and experience?
It is my hope that we can begin to answer these questions and raise other ones that will enable us to understand better the process through which we try to make sense of the world. In order to approach these questions, we will read and analyze a series of literary and philosophical texts and we will also view two films. Please note that all course material highlights the difficulty of interpretation. In other words, our goal is to develop the critical thinking skills that enable us to more accurately read our experiences and understand representations of our environments. With this goal in mind, I have decided to introduce you to a number of works that interrogate the notions of identity, authority, and truth. In other words, we will use the texts in our course as examples for an investigation of how narratives construct or if you prefer, color, our sense of “reality.” Texts in the course include: H.C. Andersen’s “The Snow Queen, Isak Dinesen’s (Karen Blixen’s) “The Blank Page” and “Roads Round Pisa,” Soren Kierkegaard’s “Fear and Trembling,” Selma Lagerlöf’s “The Saga of Gösta Berling,” and two tales by Edgar Allen Poe, “William Wilson” and “The Man of the Crowd.” We shall also watch two films, Reprise by Joakim von Trier and Ingmar Bergman’s The Seventh Seal.

SCAN 259 Vikings through the Icelandic Sagas: The Twilight of the Family Saga (4 credits) Gurley
CRN: 15472, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement.
Of the entire corpus of medieval European literature, there is nothing quite like the ‘Sagas of the Icelanders’ or ‘family sagas.’ Falling somewhere between historical novel and prose epic, these fusions of history, genealogy, vita, and legend are composed against the grain of European aesthetics. The products of an experimental commonwealth that flourished in letters, they are long, prose narratives written in a vernacular tongue, saturated with an inexhaustible violence, recounting the exploits and affairs of Iceland’s greatest families. In this course we will explore the notion that by the time we get the heyday of sagas production in the middle of the 13th century, the art form is already in decay. The pressure brought on by the decline of the commonwealth, the subsequent subjection to the Norwegian crown, and the popularity of continental romance see the end to this native art form; but, not before it gives us some of medieval literature’s brightest stars and roughest outlaws: Egill Skallagrimsson, Thorstein the Staffstruck, Gisli Sursson, Gunnar of Hlidarend, and Burnt Njal. The primary texts will be supplemented with secondary readings, including selections from the Book of Settlements and the Great Icelandic Law Code, The Gray Goose.

GER 311 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits)
CRN: 12737. This course satisfies the Arts & Letters (A&L) requirement.
Cultural intersubjectivity is part of the background knowledge that enables speakers of a language to communicate with another. Students of German are therefore better able to speak German if they share the cultural knowledge of the Germans, Austrians, and Swiss. German 311 is part of a year-long sequence (Ger 311 through Ger 313) which seeks a balance between working with intellectually stimulating content and practicing the skills needed to communicate on an intermediate to advanced level in a foreign language. The course is designed to allow students to access cultural and communicative contexts in order to establish an understanding of the relationship between the basic linguistic skills (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) and the cultural presuppositions (knowledge of history, art, film, politics, and music) that exist in the German speaking countries. In this way, German 311 prepares students for the literature and culture courses for the German or German Studies minor and major. Even as a non-major, however, this is an ideal course for a student who wants to take an advanced language class that trains his or her linguistic skills within the context of actual linguistic and cultural practices. German 311 provides you with meaningful opportunities to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define German literature and German area studies.

SCAN 316 History of Cinema: Undoing the Body in New Nordic Cinema (4 credits) Mier-Cruz
CRN: 16134, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. This course also satisfies a core course requirement of the Cinema Studies major.
The Nordic countries are often considered to have the most gender equal societies in the world, and the push for gender equality in their film industries has been groundbreaking. In 2013, several Swedish theaters began to rate films according to the Bechdel test, which measures whether a film features at least two women discussing topics other than a man. In 2016, the Swedish Film Institute established Goal 2020: Gender equality in film production, both in front of and behind the camera, a plan that promotes an increase of women in prominent roles in productions, increased visibility and funding for women filmmakers, increased representation of diversity, and qualitative gender equality reports. In the wake of the Me Too and Times Up movements, the film industries in the Nordic countries are therefore well-positioned to continue to fight for gender equality and diverse representation in film. This course will explore the roles of gender and sexuality in Nordic cinema and filmmaking, both in front of and behind the lens. Focus will be on contemporary film, but we will also trace the history of women in Scandinavian cinema. We will of course discuss each screened film as a work in itself in addition to how they uniquely contribute to the greater arenas of Scandinavian cinema and feminist filmmaking.

GER 354 German Gender Studies: Women “Terrorists” in German Literature, Film, and Art (4 credits) Anderson
CRN 16136, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement as well as the International Cultures (IC) requirement. This course also satisfies an upper division requirement of the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies major/minor.
In contrast to mainstream West German student-protest movements in the 1960s and 1970s, the leadership in radical protest groups included a high percentage of well-educated young women, such as Gudrun Ensslin and Ulrike Meinhof. They and other women revolutionaries from that time continue to attract both scholarly and popular attention into the reasons for their transformation into “disorderly women.” This course will analyze attempts to give meaning to such women figures within a framework of films, stories, essays, photographs, fashion, and art that focus on gender and violence, on fears of forceful women and a fascination with their deaths, and on notions of the “terrorist” in contemporary culture.

GER 360 Introduction to German Literature: Poetry, Plays, Prose (4 credits) Klebes
CRN: 16137, taught in German. This course satisfies the Arts & Letters (A&L) requirement.
This course will introduce you to German literary texts of different kinds: dramatic, narrative, and lyrical. We will discuss why and to what end literary texts come in these different genres, and read examples of each. As a matching counterpart to the idea of genre – a term rooted in notions such as kind, offspring, species, and family – the themes of the texts we will study will revolve around family relations of various sorts. We will be reading poems by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Hölderlin, prose texts by Franz Kafka and Uwe Timm, and plays by Bertolt Brecht and G.E. Lessing. In conjunction with literary study, we will work on building your vocabulary and review advanced grammatical structures. All readings and class discussion will be in German.

GER 401 Research (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 12740

SCAN 401 Research (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 15457

GER 403 Thesis (1-12 credits) Staff CRN: 12741

SCAN 403 Thesis (1-12 credits) Staff CRN: 15458

GER 405 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 12742

SCAN 405 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 15459

SWED 405 Reading (1-16 cr) Staff CRN: 15744

GER 407 Seminar: From Distanciation to Immersion in Modern Theatrical Practice (4 credits) Boos
CRN: 16144, taught in German. This seminar will explore the boundaries of modern German theatrical practice by examining how playwrights and theatre directors since Brecht have extended the role of the audience from witness to co-actor and even co-creator of a given performance. We will look at epic plays and post-dramatic staging practices that address the role of the theatre and performance arts in society by working toward the production of a particular form of immediacy. We will ask, in other words, how the theatre can, through the accommodation of a space for political opposition, and the creation and implementation of playful interaction and even interactive tasks, create unique experiences of distanciation and immersion.

GER 409 Practicum (1-4 credits) Staff CRN: 12743

SCAN 409 Practicum (1-3 credits) Staff CRN: 15460

GER 411 Advanced Language Training (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 12744. Constant practice in speaking and writing with emphasis on complex syntactic structures as well as idiomatic nuances in German.

GER 470 German for Reading Knowledge I (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 12746, taught in English. Intensive practice in grammar; reading texts in the student’s own field. Primarily for graduate students in other disciplines. Recommended for students who want extra training in translation. This course is taught in English in an intensive workshop approach and is the prerequisite for GER 471 taught in winter 2019.

Graduate Courses:

GER 503 Thesis (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 12747

GER 507 Seminar: From Distanciation to Immersion in Modern Theatrical Practice  (4 credits) Boos
CRN: 16145, taught in German. This seminar will explore the boundaries of modern German theatrical practice by examining how playwrights and theatre directors since Brecht have extended the role of the audience from witness to co-actor and even co-creator of a given performance. We will look at epic plays and post-dramatic staging practices that address the role of the theatre and performance arts in society by working toward the production of a particular form of immediacy. We will ask, in other words, how the theatre can, through the accommodation of a space for political opposition, and the creation and implementation of playful interaction and even interactive tasks, create unique experiences of distanciation and immersion.

GER 570 German for Reading Knowledge I (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 12749, taught in English. Intensive practice in grammar; reading texts in the student’s own field. Primarily for graduate students in other disciplines. Recommended for students who want extra training in translation. This course is taught in English in an intensive workshop approach and is the prerequisite for GER 571 taught in winter 2019.

GER 601 Research (1-6 credits) Staff CRN: 12750

GER 603 Dissertation (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 12751

GER 605 Reading (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 12752

GER 608 College Doctoral Presentation (1-2 credits) Staff CRN: 12753

GER 608 College Curriculum Development (4 credits) Staff CRN: 12754

GER 608 Translation Studies (1-2 credits) Anderson
CRN: 16953. Class meets on three Fridays – October 12, November 16, and November 30.

GER 609 Practicum (1-16 credits) Staff CRN: 12755

GER 609 Practicum Language Teaching (1-16 credits) Vogel 
CRN: 12756

GER 610 Teaching Methodology (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 12757. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the theory and practice of foreign language pedagogy and to guide you along your first quarter of teaching at the University of Oregon. The course will provide you with the theoretical background of most recent trends in foreign language teaching methodologies. The theoretical foundation will be applied to the teaching of the four skills such as speaking, listening, reading and writing and the teaching of culture to help you develop a repertoire of teaching techniques and strategies in any of these areas. This will allow you to develop your own philosophy of foreign language teaching and match your own teaching style considering the needs of a diverse student body.
Course Goals:
Demonstration of an understanding of current theories of second-language acquisition research
Lesson plan design that reflect current SLA theory and practice
Design and/or selection of the most appropriate assessment tools for the FL class
Use of technology as a tool for professional development and to promote student learning
Development of the ability to reflect on teaching, to research issues pertaining to daily teaching practice, and to make changes and adjustments as warranted

GER 690 Literary Studies (4 credits) Klebes
CRN: 16135. Structured not chronologically but rather by select methodological aspects, this seminar presents a review of major strands of theoretical thinking in literary studies, predominantly in the 20th century (with short forays into the 19th and the 21st). Key concepts to which individual sessions will be devoted will include interpretation, history, intention, reception, sign, critique, society, gender, and philology. As a core course for the graduate programs in German, this course is projected to be instructed in German, but we will find ways to accommodate interested students from other disciplines.

 

Summer 2018

GER 101, 102, 103 First Year German (5 credits each)
CRNs: 40971, 40972, 40973
Complete the entire first year of German in just nine weeks!
This intensive series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture. You will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

GER 201, 202, 203   Second Year German (4 credits each)
CRNs: 40974, 40975, 40976
This sequence is designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. You will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond. As we have done in the 100 series, we will use as much German as possible right from the start and we will help you to do the same. Your active participation will quickly yield results!

GER 223 Germany: A Multicultural Society (4 credits)  ONLINE!  Vogel
CRN: 40977; course dates are July 23-August 19. Taught in English. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) as well as the Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP) requirement.
This course examines the multiethnic complexities of German, Austrian, and/or Swiss societies through the writings of African, Turkish, or Jewish Germans as well as contemporary films on the topic. This course introduces students to the political and social challenges faced by post-unification Germany. We will consider the historical, socioeconomic, political and cultural issues of minority populations. As we study the various groups, we will investigate the way in which they have helped to redefine what counts as “German” today. Period of focus varies. Note: This course takes place entirely online, with assignments delivered, submitted, and graded via CANVAS and email. I will hold office hours in 208 Friendly Hall every Monday. If you are not attending classes on the UO campus, please contact me immediately to set up alternative forms of communication. Lectures will be a combination of video presentation and audio lectures; assignments include weekly journal entries, discussion board postings, close reading projects, and essay exams. Weekly modules organize this class, and you are responsible for keeping up with the work.

GER 355 German Cinema (4 credits)  Vogel
CRN: 40978; course dates are June 25-July 22. Taught in English.
In-depth analysis of various facets of one of the greatest traditions in world cinema. Topics include film and the Third Reich, cinema and technology, German filmmakers in American exile, German New Wave.

 



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