Courses

Link to UO catalog

Winter 2023

German and Swedish Language Courses

 
GER 102 First Year German (5 credits)
CRNs: 22169, 22170, 22171.
 
GER 202 Second Year German (4 credits)
CRNs: 22172, 22173.
 
SWED 202 Second Year Swedish (4 credits)
CRN: 26049.
 
GER 312 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits)
CRN: 22176.

Literature and Culture Courses

 
GER 220M and SCAN 220M Existentialism in Literature and Philosophy (4 credits) Librett
Inside-Out course taught at the Oregon State Correctional Institution in Salem, OR. Admission to the course by application only.
Human life is finite, and we live in a world of (increasingly) uncertain values: what will you do to make your life as meaningful as possible?  “Existentialism”—the focus of this course--is a philosophy of radical freedom and radical self-responsibility.  It enjoins us to create our own ethical and aesthetic values without however forgetting that we live with and for others. This existentialist approach to life was developed in works of philosophy, fiction, and art from the 19th through the 20th century.  We examine central works by German and French speaking authors, including Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger, Franz Kafka, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Franz Fanon.   
 
GER 222 Voices of Dissent: Representations of the Holocaust in History, Literature, and Film (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 25674, taught in English. This course offers an introduction to the events of the Holocaust. We discuss questions surrounding its representation in various forms (historical prose, memoir, fiction, film). Students discuss how we can adequately represent the scale of violence, trauma, and suffering, how we can understand and/or explain the events of the Holocaust, what the advantages and disadvantages for comprehension/explanation belonging to various modes of representation are, and how language influences how we can “know” and what we can “learn” from the Holocaust.
 
GER 251 Sexuality (4 credits) Hoeller
CRN: 25769, taught in English. The turn of the 20th century has been one decisive moment in Western sexuality discourses, the turn of the 21st century has been another. This course traces the changes and new understandings of the dynamics of sexuality in Germany and Austria at both turns of the century and the years following them and historically as well as culturally contextualizes sexuality discourses. We will examine pioneering and oftentimes provocative works from German artists and scientists of the time to explore changing sexual norms as well as resistance to and upheaval of such norms. Topics include sexuality in psychoanalytical thought, literary and cinematic explorations of sexuality, and homosexual and transgender rights and visibility.
 
SCAN 325 Scandinavian Children's Literature (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 25774, taught in English. This course introduces students to the study of children’s literature from the countries of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland. We will begin by examining the origins of Scandinavian children’s literature in early folk and fairytales and trace its evolution through the nineteenth and twentieth century in stories and picture books up to the present. We will read works by some of the most well-known children’s book authors to come out of the Nordic countries, including Astrid Lindgren, Tove Jansson, Elsa Beskow, Hans Christian Andersen, Selma Lagerlöf, and Sven Nordqvist. Students will be introduced to theoretical readings in the study of children’s literature, and we will examine these stories in their historical, pedagogical, and social contexts. The emphasis of the course will be on analysis and interpretation of these texts and how they reflect the child’s changing position in society with regard to ethnicity, gender, and power constellations. We will also pay particular attention to how children’s literature has re-imagined fairy tale structures and motifs, and how supernatural figures like elves, trolls, and mermaids are transformed throughout Scandinavian children’s literature.
 
SCAN 353 Women Writers: The Baroness, the Beggar, and the Minimalist (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 25775, taught in English. This year’s course on Scandinavian Women’s Writing will look at three storytellers who tell their tales very differently. We will start with the Danish Baroness Karen Blixen who often wrote using a male pseudonym, Isak Dinesen. Her fascination with the art of the short story and fondness for puzzle like forms and twisting turns of fate will color out first exploration. After this, we will stay in Denmark, turning our attention to the brutal honesty of Tove Ditlefsen’s Copenhagen Trilogy, where she tells the story of her own life with an unsparing eye. The directness of Ditlefsen’s memoirs stands in sharp contrast to the ornate structures of Blixen’s tales. We will also read a series of short stories by Ditlefsen and explore the relationship between a life lived and a life as it is written. Our third stop brings us to our own moment in time and the Norwegian writer Gunnhild Øyehaug who writes micro-stories, some as short as a paragraph. These epigrammatic works depict daily life in a seemingly magical way. We will end the course by reflecting how women’s writing changed from the mid twentieth century to our own digitally saturated world. Books include: Isak Dinesen: Seven Gothic Tales and Anecdotes of Destiny, Tove Ditlefsen: The Copenhagen Trilogy, and Gunnhild Øyehaug: Knots.
 
SCAN 354 Scandinavian Short Fiction (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 25776, taught in English. This class will introduce students to Scandinavian literature through the genre of the short story. Students will read stories by authors from Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland from different literary periods (from the eighteenth century up to the present) in order to gain an understanding of the social, historical, and political context of these nations and how they are taken up in the genre of the short story. Students will read stories by authors such as Isak Dinesen, August Strindberg, Selma Lagerlöf, Pär Lagerkvist, Peter Høeg, Sigrid Undset, and the darker more adult works of beloved children’s authors Hans Christian Andersen and Tove Jansson. In addition to studying the form of the short story, students will also be introduced to different literary movements within Scandinavian literature such as: realism, Gothic fiction, feminist fiction, Romanticism, etc.
 
GER 355 German Cinema: Weimar Cinema and Its Legacies (4 credits) Calhoon
CRN: 25770 (plus Discussion Sections), taught in English. German cinema after the First World War enjoyed a golden age, garnering international acclaim for both its technical and artistic innovation. Films deemed “Expressionist,” such as Robert Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and F. W. Murnau’s Nosferatu, are perhaps the most recognizable, but they represent only one stylistic subset of the films produced during the Weimar Republic (1919-1933). The rise of National Socialism and the pull of Hollywood combined to prompt a large-scale migration of filmmaking talent to the United States. Once in America, Austrian-born Wilhelm “Billy” Wilder set a course for both film noir (Sunset Boulevard, Double Indemnity) and comedy (The Seven-Year Itch, Some Like it Hot), and cinematographer Karl Freund (Caligari, Metropolis) went on to photograph a range of productions from Dracula to I Love Lucy. These are but two of the many figures to be explored in a course designed to trace key strains of American cinematic culture back to early twentieth-century Germany. The course will proceed along several key tangents, including (1) the issue of exile and the uncanniness of films made by filmmakers not fully “at home” in the U.S., (2) the abiding presence of early German cinema in American films made well after the acme of émigré filmmaking, and (3) the migration of certain trends from Hollywood through the French and German new waves and back again.  
Students in GER 355 will be introduced to the technical vocabulary of film study, and they will be required to demonstrate a working command of this terminology in their written work for the course. They will likewise be introduced to the general landscape of the cinema of the Weimar period, including the socio-political background, and to the various specific styles of German filmmaking, such as Expressionism, “New Objectivity,” and early experiments in both animation and cinematic abstraction. The technical vocabulary will enable them to identify and trace the influence of Weimar cinema on American film culture both before and after the fall of the Weimar Republic in 1933; the social and historical background will help them discern ways in which films made in the US by German émigrés, some of them Jewish, served to process the experience of persecution, exile, alienation, or even nostalgia.
 
GER 361 Literary Movements: Nature Magic in German Fairytales (4 credits) Ostmeier
CRN: 25771. The Grimm Brothers described Fairy Tales as Nature Poetry. Wells, woods, hedges, bones, birds, and other animals are often featured as agents of magic that defy modern civilization. We will examine the tensions between nature, wonder, the environment, and society in tales from the 19th to 21st Centuries. We will focus on Mermaids, Sirens, Undines. Our discussions will place the tales in their cultural contexts and contemporary ecocritical thought. Investigative conversations, brief lectures, excursions, analytical and creative assignments. Class will be conducted in German. View course flyer.
 
GER 406 Practicum: German Teaching (2 credits) Vogel
CRN: 25973. This internship course is designed to offer undergraduate students of German an introduction to the principles of foreign language instruction, especially as they apply to teaching children. Students practice teaching techniques and have the opportunity to teach beginning German to elementary-school or middle-school students. They will have the chance to evaluate their own teaching, the school experience, and/or the curriculum in a final written project.
 
GER 407 Seminar -- Aesthetics and Critique: Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Judgment (4 credits) Librett
CRN: 22181, taught in English. Kant’s Critique of Judgment (1790)—his principal work on aesthetics and teleology--is undoubtedly one of the most interesting and influential philosophical texts of the last three centuries in any philosophical subdiscipline.   Knowledge of this treatise is a prerequisite to any understanding of the subsequent history of aesthetic theory, as well as German Idealism more generally.  We’ll spend half the term reading the Critique of Judgment, exploring the beautiful and the sublime (the aesthetic), as well organic nature (the teleological), as modalities of reflexive judgment.   We will then look at a three highly significant 19th and 20th century transformations of the Kantian conceptualization, which we can characterize as rhetorical, psychological, and political displacements, respectively.  First, we’ll consider the German romantic theory of « wit » and «irony » in Jean Paul and Friedrich Schlegel.  Second, we’ll study Sigmund Freud’s modernist appropriation of this German romantic aesthetics of wit in his « Wit and its Relation to the Unconscious. »   Third, we’ll explore Hannah Arendt’s proposal that Kant’s aesthetic theory prepares the foundations for a productive political philosophy.  With this last, perhaps we come full circle : whereas Kant’s aesthetic theory is often considered to be the first full articulation of the separation of aesthetics from politics—the creation of an autonomous aesthetics through the notion of disinterested pleasure—Arendt’s reading of Kant reverses this movement, discovering precisely in his aesthetics a basis for a new politics. Graduate students will be invited and expected to explore, in addition to the primary texts, some major secondary literature on Kant’s Critique of Judgment, from the analytic and/or continental traditions, according to the given student’s interests.

Additional Offerings

 
GER 401 Research (1-16 credits)
CRN: 22178.
 
SCAN 401 Research (1-21 credits)
CRN: 24574.
 
GER 403 Thesis (1-12 credits)
CRN: 22179.
 
SCAN 403 Thesis (1-12 credits)
CRN: 24575.
 
GER 405 Reading and Conference (1-16 credits)
CRN: 22180.
 
SCAN 405 Reading and Conference (1-21 credits)
CRN: 24576.
 
SWED 405 Reading and Conference (1-16 credits) Howard
CRN: 24840.
 
SCAN 406 Practicum (1-12 credits)
CRN: 25976.

Fall 2022

German and SWEDish language Courses

GER 101 First Year German (5 credits)
CRNs: 11954, 11955, 11956, 11957. This series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture: you will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

GER 201 Second Year German (4 Credits)
CRNs: 11958, 11959. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement. This is the fourth quarter of a two-year sequence designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In German 201, you will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with engaging cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond.

SWED 201 Second Year Swedish (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 11993.

GER 311 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits)
CRN: 11966. This course satisfies one Arts and Letters requirement.  Extensive practice in speaking and writing German, and complex grammatical structures in writing.

SWED 405 Third Year Swedish (1-16 credits) Howard
CRN: 11994.

GER 411 Advanced Language Training (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 11974

Literature & culture Courses

GER 221 Postwar Germany (4 credits) Anderson
CRN: 11960 + Discussion, taught in English.  This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. The course explores notions about East/West and united German culture and society as reflected in a series of narratives, films, and essays. How do these reveal changing ideas in Germany about the connection between the past and present? The texts and films address issues that have helped shape the ways Germans think today.

GER 250 Culture of Money (4 credits) Klebes
CRN: 11965, taught in English.

SCAN 251 Text and Interpretation: Masks and the Ecstatic Experience (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 11983, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements.  This class is about stories. It is about how we tell them, what they mean to us, and how narrative permeates the very fabric of our understanding of the world. Considering this and remembering that our "universe" of stories includes narratives that we have been told, have read, and tell ourselves; we can safely say that we are not the authors of our entire sense of the world. This raises several interesting questions about the relationship between the "self" and the "other." It is my hope that we can begin to answer these questions and raise other ones that will enable us to understand better the process through which we try to make sense of the world. With this goal in mind, I have decided to introduce you to a number of works that interrogate the notions of identity, authority, and truth. In other words, we will use the texts in our course as examples for an investigation of how narratives construct or if you prefer, color, our sense of "reality."

SCAN 259 Vikings through the Iceland Sagas (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 11984, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements.

SCAN 315 Nordic Cinema (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 11985, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Also satisfies Cinema Studies Core C requirement.This course offers a survey of Nordic cinema from the silent era to the present, with a focus on films from the first half of the twentieth century. Films will be viewed and analyzed within their aesthetic and historical contexts.Directors we will study include: Mauritz Stiller, Victor Sjöström, Carl Theodor Dryer, Edith Carlmar, Ingmar Bergman, Alf Sjöberg, and Henning Carlsen.

GER/SCAN 345M Food, Culture, and Identity (4 credits) Vogel
CRNs: 16000/15999, taught in English.

GER 362 Interpretive Models (4 credits) Klebes
CRN: 11968, taught in German.

GER 407 Seminar: Representations of Women “Terrorists” in German Film, Literature, and Art (4 credits) Anderson
CRN: 11972, taught in English.  In contrast to mainstream West German student protest movements in the 1960s and 1970s, the leadership in radical protest groups included a high percentage of well-educated young women, such as Gudrun Ensslin and Ulrike Meinhof. Ensslin was a pastor’s daughter, and Meinhof had been a respec-ted journalist. Both died while in prison. At the time both became icons of the protest against what many Germans viewed as a patriarchal state in danger of reverting to its militaristic, totalitarian past.  Meinhof, Ensslin, and other women in the Red Army Faction (RAF), Rote Zora, and the 2 June Movement continue to attract both scholarly and popular attention into the reasons for their transformation into “disorderly women.” Their cases are often included in studies that investigate the “phenomenon” of radical women in general, especially women “terrorists.” A series of German films, art exhibits, and narratives since the 1970s have explored the idea of the politically violent woman and her often violent death. They analyze the notion of revolution as a means to create radically new ways of perceiving. 

 

Spring 2022

German and SWEDish language Courses

GER 103 First Year German (5 credits)
CRNs: 33573, 33574, 33575. This series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture: you will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

GER 203 Second Year German (4 credits)
CRNs: 33577, 33578. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement. This is the sixth quarter of a two-year sequence designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In German 203, you will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with engaging cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond.

GER 313 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits) Klueppel
CRN: 33584. This course satisfies one Arts and Letters requirement.  Extensive practice in speaking and writing German, and complex grammatical structures in writing.

GER 412 Advanced Language Training (4 credits) Bayerl
CRN: 33592. Dieser Kurs soll Ihnen dabei helfen, Ihr geschriebenes Deutsch zu verbessern. Wie klappt das am besten? Indem Sie verschiedene Arten des Schreibens kennenlernen, untersuchen und auch selbst anwenden. Sie werden lernen, wie man richtig formuliert, welche Vokabeln und Redewendungen man zu welchem Anlass benutzt, und wie sich allgemein die Schriftsprache von der gesprochenen Sprache unterscheidet. Dieser Kurs ist auch dafür geeignet, Ihre Hemmungen bei dem Umgang mit deutscher Literatur abzubauen, indem wir Ihr Vertrauen in Ihr eigenes Können beim Lesen, Schreiben und Analysieren von literarischen Texten aufbauen. Neben kurzen Aufsätzen zu Literatur und Film werden Sie auch viele praxisorientierte Texte verfassen, zum Beispiel einen aktuellen Lebenslauf (resumé) und einen Bewerbungsbrief, so dass ihre Deutschkenntnisse Teil Ihrer zukünftigen Karriere sein können.

SWED 103 First Year Swedish (5 credits) Howard
CRN: 33609. The goal of this course is to introduce Swedish as it is used in everyday contexts, such as talking about yourself, finding your way around, and describing your immediate surroundings. The course will be taught in a communicative way. In-class activities and homework will focus on speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. To succeed in this course, you must actively participate. Class will be conducted primarily, but not exclusively in Swedish. You will be expected to attend class regularly, to prepare for class daily, and speak as much Swedish as possible.

Literature & culture Courses

GER 222  Voices of Dissent (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 33579 + Discussion.

GER/SCAN 280M  Quality of Life in Germany and Scandinavia (4 credits) Vogel
CRNs: 33611/33600.

SCAN 325 Constructions versus Constrictions of Identity (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 33601. This course introduces students to the study of children’s literature from the countries of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland. We will begin by examining the origins of Scandinavian children’s literature in early folk and fairytales and trace its evolution through the nineteenth and twentieth century in stories and picture books up to the present. We will read works by some of the most well-known children’s book authors to come out of the Nordic countries, including Astrid Lindgren, Tove Jansson, Elsa Beskow, Hans Christian Andersen, Selma Lagerlöf, and Sven Nordqvist. Students will be introduced to theoretical readings in the study of children’s literature, and we will examine these stories in their historical, pedagogical, and social contexts. The emphasis of the course will be on analysis and interpretation of these texts and how they reflect the child’s changing position in society with regard to ethnicity, gender, and power constellations. We will also pay particular attention to how children’s literature has re-imagined fairy tale structures and motifs, and how supernatural figures like elves, trolls, and mermaids are transformed throughout Scandinavian children’s literature.

SCAN 354  Genres Scandinavian Literature: Multiplying Scandinavia: Indigeneity, Immigration, and the Welfare State (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 33602. Recent patterns of immigration and migration have brought new populations into contact with Scandinavian cultures, increasing the region’s diversity. In addition, three out of the four countries in the region are home to the Sami people, who have been residing in Northern Scandinavia before the Norwegian, Finnish, and Swedish people of the region arrived, and in Denmark, there is a substantial Inuit population, as Greenland is still a Danish colony. This mix of cultures sometimes collides with the ethos of the modern welfare state, which is based on a notion of the citizen that does not necessarily consider the cultures of either the new arrivals to the region or its original inhabitants, its first people.So, while we tend to think of being Scandinavian in singular terms, in actuality there are many Scandinavians from a variety of backgrounds. It follows that we will use multiplication as a tool to look at the oldest and newest residents of the region, while keeping in mind that this change of perspective raises a whole host of issues revolving around migration, environmental degradation, colonial education, the rights of non-citizens, and the life of minorities within the structure of what was a fairly mono-cultural society. The materials of the course reflect this diversity. We will begin by watching 2 films made by and about the indigenous Sami people.  After that we will read four books: the memoirs of a Greek born Swedish author who arrived in the north in the 1960s, a short teen novel by a Pakistani-Norwegian author and filmmaker, a series of short stories written by an exiled Chilean writer living in Denmark, an inventive mystery written by a Swedish novelist whose parent hail from both Sweden and Tunisia, and we will conclude with a film co-produced in Gambia and Sweden depicting the life of a young Afro-Swedish rapper and his Gambian mother. These readings will be supplemented by essays written for a collection entitled Migration, Family, and the Welfare State.

GER 368  Themes in German Literature: German Identities (4 credits) Klebes
CRN: 33585. Im Zentrum dieses Kurses steht unsere Lektüre des Romans 1000 Serpentinen Angst (2020) von Olivia Wenzel. Dieses Buch dreht sich um eine ostdeutsche Protagonistin schwarzer Hautfarbe und wird uns Anlass zu einer intensiven Beschäftigung mit der literarischen Darstellung von rassistischer, herkunftsbezogener und sexistischer Diskriminierung geben. Weitere Themen, mit denen wir uns befassen werden, sind: sexuelle Identitäten, Rechtsextremismus in Ostdeutschland und die narrative Darstellung von persönlichen und kollektiven Traumata. Neben dem Roman lesen wir eine Reihe von Intertexten, die sich thematisch mit den genannten Themen im heutigen Deutschland beschäftigen. Weiterhin werden wir historische Kontexte dieser Phänomene betrachten und eine Reihe von Quellen bearbeiten (Erzählungen, Kinderbücher, Musik, Fotokunst), auf die Wenzel in ihrem Roman anspielt. (Ich weise darauf hin, dass Wenzels Sprache stellenweise explizit Rassismus und Sexualität benennt und sich daher auch unsere Diskussion der Herausforderung stellen muss, diese Fragen angemessen zu behandeln.) Alle Lektüren und Diskussionen auf Deutsch.

GER 407  Naturalism in the North (4 credits) Gurley
CRN: 33589. For writers in Northern Europe, Naturalism explained the human being as a product of heredity and environment rather than a construction of various social contracts or a product of divine creation. Charles Darwin’s 1859 On the Origin of Species had a profound effect on the literary landscape of Germany and Scandinavia. The noted German paleontologist Heinrich Georg Bronn’s translation of the On the Origin of Species appeared in April, 1860, only months after Darwin’s original publication. And J.P Jacobsen’s translations of Darwin in the early 1870’s were foundational to the movement known as “The Modern Breakthrough” in Scandinavian letters. In this course, we will look at writers who anticipated the movement of Naturalism in the North, those who contested its aesthetic parameters, and finally explore the trajectory of Naturalism in contemporary eco-criticism. Naturalism’s relation to realism, impressionism, and decadence will also be considered. Writers to be discussed include: Georg Büchner, Heinrich Heine, J.P. Jacobsen, Johannes V. Jensen, Gernot Böhme, and Arne Næss.

GER 409  Practical German Teaching (1-4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 33590.  In collaboration with Eugene public schools, the Department of German and Scandinavian is excited to offer a German-teaching internship program for dedicated undergraduate majors or minors in German who enjoy working with children and possess a high proficiency in the language. GER 409 students employ new and fun driven teaching approached in settings from pre-school through sixth grade levels, and will act as ambassadors for GERSCAN working towards our mission of promoting global citizenship across all curricula.


Fall 2021

German and SWEDish language Courses

GER 101 First Year German (5 credits)
CRNs: 12839, 12840, 12841, 12842, 12843. This series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture: you will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

GER 201 Second Year German (4 Credits)
CRNs: 12847, 12848. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement. This is the fourth quarter of a two-year sequence designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In German 201, you will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with engaging cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond.

SWED 101 First Year Swedish (5 credits) Howard
CRN: 15860. The goal of this course is to introduce Swedish as it is used in everyday contexts, such as talking about yourself, finding your way around, and describing your immediate surroundings. The course will be taught in a communicative way. In-class activities and homework will focus on speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. To succeed in this course, you must actively participate. Class will be conducted primarily, but not exclusively in Swedish. You will be expected to attend class regularly, to prepare for class daily, and speak as much Swedish as possible.

GER 311 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits)
CRN: 12856. This course satisfies one Arts and Letters requirement.  Extensive practice in speaking and writing German, and complex grammatical structures in writing.

SWED 405 Third Year Swedish (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 15863.

Literature & culture Courses

GER 221 Postwar Germany (4 credits) Anderson
CRN: 12850 + Discussion, taught in English.  This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. The course explores notions about East/West and united German culture and society as reflected in a series of narratives, films, and essays. How do these reveal changing ideas in Germany about the connection between the past and present? The texts and films address issues that have helped shape the ways Germans think today.

SCAN 251 Text and Interpretation: Masks and the Ecstatic Experience (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 15571, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements.  This class is about stories. It is about how we tell them, what they mean to us, and how narrative permeates the very fabric of our understanding of the world. Considering this and remembering that our "universe" of stories includes narratives that we have been told, have read, and tell ourselves; we can safely say that we are not the authors of our entire sense of the world. This raises several interesting questions about the relationship between the "self" and the "other." It is my hope that we can begin to answer these questions and raise other ones that will enable us to understand better the process through which we try to make sense of the world. With this goal in mind, I have decided to introduce you to a number of works that interrogate the notions of identity, authority, and truth. In other words, we will use the texts in our course as examples for an investigation of how narratives construct or if you prefer, color, our sense of "reality."

GER 252 War, Trauma, Violence (4 credits) Librett
CRN: 17154, taught in EnglishFulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements.  Wars, violence, and their traumas have affected German and Austrian culture and society in drastic ways throughout their history, and in particularly extreme proportions since early in the 20th century. This course will study major works of literature, thought, art, and film that deal with war, violence, and trauma since the early 1900s: moving from World War I, through the interwar period where the “war neuroses” were first discovered and theorized, across the Nazi period and World War II. We will also look at the processing of these events in the Cold War and post-unification periods.

SCAN 259 Vikings through the Iceland Sagas (4 credits) Gurley
CRN: 15572, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Of the entire corpus of medieval European literature, there is nothing quite like the ‘Sagas of the Icelanders’ or ‘family sagas.’ Falling somewhere between historical novel and prose epic, these fusions of history, genealogy, vita, and legend are composed against the grain of European aesthetics. In this course, we will explore the notion that by the time we get the heyday of sagas production in the middle of the 13th century, the art form is already in decay. The primary texts will be supplemented with secondary readings, including selections from the Book of Settlements and the great Icelandic law code, The Gray Goose.

SCAN 316 Nordic Cinema (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 16269, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Also satisfies Cinema Studies Core C requirement.This course offers a survey of Nordic cinema from the silent era to the present, with a focus on films from the first half of the twentieth century. Films will be viewed and analyzed within their aesthetic and historical contexts.Directors we will study include: Mauritz Stiller, Victor Sjöström, Carl Theodor Dryer, Edith Carlmar, Ingmar Bergman, Alf Sjöberg, and Henning Carlsen.

SCAN 343 Norse Mythology (4 credits) Gurley
CRN: 16264, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Also satisfies Folklore and Public Culture requirement.This course will be a critical evaluation of the religious beliefs in Scandinavia from prehistory through the Viking Age. We will examine very thoroughly three mythological texts, The Edda, The Prose Edda, and Ynglinga saga. To facilitate our study of the primary sources of Norse mythology we will make use of both Indo-European data and Scandinavian folklore and belief. Throughout the course the students will be encouraged to broaden their understanding of the primary materials by being introduced to many of the scholarly debates and trends of the field.

GER 366 Themes in German Literature (4 credits) Anderson
CRN: 12858, taught in German. This course satisfies the Arts & Letters (A&L) requirement. Die Figur der “Neuen Frau” erschien in der Literatur des späten 19. Und frühen 20. Jahrhunderts, zu einer Zeit, in der die Geschlechterrollen sich änderten. Wir werden Erzählungen lesen, die sich mit Debatten über Sexualität, Beruf, Ehe und der sozialen Stellung von Frauen befassen.

GER 407 Seminar: Tyranny Redux (4 credits) Calhoon
CRN: 12862. Concentrated in the person of Donald Trump are nativist and undemocratic tendencies that not only preceded his presidency but seem only to have gained in strength following his electoral defeat in November 2020. Over these past few years we have seen the aspirations of a major party reduced to the personal needs of its new figurehead—a leader whose guiding sense of grievance and betrayal, whose incitements to violence and concomitant fear of appearing weak, whose claims to absolute political sovereignty, not to mention a disdain for religion that endears him to the faithful, have invited comparisons to prior authoritarian regimes, Germany’s Third Reich in particular. This seminar is designed to examine the current cultural and political moment under the lens of critical methods and analyses that arose before, during, or in the wake of the earlier one. Key readings to include: Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism; Walter Benjamin, Critique of Violence; S. Freud, Totem and Taboo and Beyond the Pleasure Principle; Max Horkheimer, “Authority and the Family”; Alexander Mitscherlich, Society Without the Father; Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism; Klaus Theweleit, Male Fantasies. We will also consider more recent and contemporary writings by Norman O. Brown, Alice Miller, Heather Cox Richardson, Timothy Snyder, Christopher Browning, Wendy Lower, Mary Trump, and Bandy Lee. Michael Haneke’s brilliant film The White Ribbon (2009) may prove pivotal to our discussions. Course to be conducted in English, though students may choose to read German texts in German or in translation.