Courses

Link to UO catalog

Fall 2021

German and SWEDish language Courses

GER 101 First Year German (5 credits)
CRNs: 12839, 12840, 12841, 12842, 12843. This series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture: you will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

GER 201 Second Year German (4 Credits)
CRNs: 12847, 12848. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement. This is the fourth quarter of a two-year sequence designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In German 201, you will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with engaging cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond.

SWED 101 First Year Swedish (5 credits) Howard
CRN: 15860. The goal of this course is to introduce Swedish as it is used in everyday contexts, such as talking about yourself, finding your way around, and describing your immediate surroundings. The course will be taught in a communicative way. In-class activities and homework will focus on speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. To succeed in this course, you must actively participate. Class will be conducted primarily, but not exclusively in Swedish. You will be expected to attend class regularly, to prepare for class daily, and speak as much Swedish as possible.

GER 311 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits)
CRN: 12856. This course satisfies one Arts and Letters requirement.  Extensive practice in speaking and writing German, and complex grammatical structures in writing.

SWED 405 Third Year Swedish (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 15863.

Literature & culture Courses

GER 221 Postwar Germany (4 credits) Anderson
CRN: 12850 + Discussion, taught in English.  This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. GER 221 FlyerThe course explores notions about East/West and united German culture and society as reflected in a series of narratives, films, and essays. How do these reveal changing ideas in Germany about the connection between the past and present? The texts and films address issues that have helped shape the ways Germans think today.

 

SCAN 251 Text and Interpretation: Masks and the Ecstatic Experience (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 15571, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements.  This class is about stories. It is about how we tell them, what they mean to us, and how narrative permeates the very fabric of our understanding of the world. Considering this and remembering that our "universe" of stories includes narratives that we have been told, have read, and tell ourselves; we can safely say that we are not the authors of our entire sense of the world. This raises several interesting questions about the relationship between the "self" and the "other." scan 251 Flyer Woman holding a mask dramaticallyIt is my hope that we can begin to answer these questions and raise other ones that will enable us to understand better the process through which we try to make sense of the world. With this goal in mind, I have decided to introduce you to a number of works that interrogate the notions of identity, authority, and truth. In other words, we will use the texts in our course as examples for an investigation of how narratives construct or if you prefer, color, our sense of "reality."

 

GER 252 War, Trauma, Violence (4 credits) Librett
CRN: 17154, taught in EnglishFulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements.  Wars, violence, and their traumas have affected German and Austrian culture and society in drastic ways throughout their history, and in particularly extreme proportions since early in the 20th century. GER 252 Flyer: Historical photograph of a young sad German child with dirt on their faceThis course will study major works of literature, thought, art, and film that deal with war, violence, and trauma since the early 1900s: moving from World War I, through the interwar period where the “war neuroses” were first discovered and theorized, across the Nazi period and World War II. We will also look at the processing of these events in the Cold War and post-unification periods.

 

SCAN 259 Vikings through the Iceland Sagas (4 credits) Gurley
CRN: 15572, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Of the entire corpus of medieval European literature, there is nothing quite like the ‘Sagas of the Icelanders’ or ‘family sagas.’ Falling somewhere between historical novel and prose epic, these fusions of history, genealogy, vita, and legend are composed against the grain of European aesthetics.scan 259 flyer, picture of a historical icelandic/norse artwork document In this course, we will explore the notion that by the time we get the heyday of sagas production in the middle of the 13th century, the art form is already in decay. The primary texts will be supplemented with secondary readings, including selections from the Book of Settlements and the great Icelandic law code, The Gray Goose.

 

SCAN 316 Nordic Cinema (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 16269, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Also satisfies Cinema Studies Core C requirement.This course offers a survey of Nordic cinema from the silent era to the present, with a focus on films from the first half of the twentieth century. Films will be viewed and analyzed within their aesthetic and historical contexts.Directors we will study include: Mauritz Stiller, Victor Sjöström, Carl Theodor Dryer, Edith Carlmar, Ingmar Bergman, Alf Sjöberg, and Henning Carlsen.

scan 316 flyer, an image of a silhouhette of people holding hands

 

SCAN 343 Norse Mythology (4 credits) Gurley
CRN: 16264, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Also satisfies Folklore and Public Culture requirement.scan 343 flyer, silhouette of a ravenThis course will be a critical evaluation of the religious beliefs in Scandinavia from prehistory through the Viking Age. We will examine very thoroughly three mythological texts, The Edda, The Prose Edda, and Ynglinga saga. To facilitate our study of the primary sources of Norse mythology we will make use of both Indo-European data and Scandinavian folklore and belief. Throughout the course the students will be encouraged to broaden their understanding of the primary materials by being introduced to many of the scholarly debates and trends of the field.

 

GER 366 Themes in German Literature (4 credits) Anderson
CRN: 12858, taught in German. This course satisfies the Arts & Letters (A&L) requirement. Die Figur der “Neuen Frau” erschien in der Literatur des späten 19. Und frühen 20. Jahrhunderts, zu einer Zeit, in der die Geschlechterrollen sich änderten. ger 366 flyer, historical photo of two german woman, one washing clothes and the other wearing pants and standing tall. Wir werden Erzählungen lesen, die sich mit Debatten über Sexualität, Beruf, Ehe und der sozialen Stellung von Frauen befassen.

 

GER 407 Seminar: Tyranny Redux (4 credits) Calhoon
CRN: 12862. Concentrated in the person of Donald Trump are nativist and undemocratic tendencies that not only preceded his presidency but seem only to have gained in strength following his electoral defeat in November 2020. Over these past few years we have seen the aspirations of a major party reduced to the personal needs of its new figurehead—a leader whose guiding sense of grievance and betrayal, whose incitements to violence and concomitant fear of appearing weak, whose claims to absolute political sovereignty, not to mention a disdain for religion that endears him to the faithful, have invited comparisons to prior authoritarian regimes, Germany’s Third Reich in particular. This seminar is designed to examine the current cultural and political moment under the lens of critical methods and analyses that arose before, during, or in the wake of the earlier one. ger 407/507 flyer comparing Trump with a photo of postwar GermanyKey readings to include: Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism; Walter Benjamin, Critique of Violence; S. Freud, Totem and Taboo and Beyond the Pleasure Principle; Max Horkheimer, “Authority and the Family”; Alexander Mitscherlich, Society Without the Father; Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism; Klaus Theweleit, Male Fantasies. We will also consider more recent and contemporary writings by Norman O. Brown, Alice Miller, Heather Cox Richardson, Timothy Snyder, Christopher Browning, Wendy Lower, Mary Trump, and Bandy Lee. Michael Haneke’s brilliant film The White Ribbon (2009) may prove pivotal to our discussions. Course to be conducted in English, though students may choose to read German texts in German or in translation.

 

Summer 2021

All German and Scandinavian classes will have remote or web instruction for summer 2021.

Language Classes

GER 201: Second Year German (4 credits)
CRN 41556.  June 21 – July 11

GER 202: Second Year German (4 credits)
CRN 41557.  July 12 – August 1

GER 203: Second Year German (4 credits)
CRN 41558.  August 2 – August 22

german summer classes flyer

Literature and Culture Classes

GER 223: Germany: A Multicultural Society (4 credits) Vogel
CRN 41559. July 19 – August 15. Taught in English. Fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L); Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP); and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Examines the multiethnic complexities of German, Austrian, and/or Swiss societies through the writings of African, Turkish, or Jewish Germans as well as contemporary films on the topic. This course introduces students to the political and social challenges faced by post-unification Germany. Period of focus varies.

ger 223 flyer

GER 354: German Gender Studies: Sirens, Mermaids, Nasty Women (4 credits) Hoeller
CRN: 42851. August 16 – September 12. Taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L); Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP); and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Counts as elective for WGS major and minor. In the 20th century, artists, writers, filmmakers have rewritten and reclaimed the sexist stories of sirens and mermaids creating in their stead new subversive myths of these “nasty women” and female empowerment. This class will be held remotely. Class time will be used for synchronous discussions (via Zoom) as well as asynchronous interactive assignments (podcast lectures, video presentations, experiential learning assignments, etc.).

ger 354 flyer

GER 355: German Cinema (4 credits) Vogel
CRN 41560. June 21 – July 18. Taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. This course also fulfills a Cinema Studies Core C requirement and Global Contexts for Business Decisions requirement. An in-depth analysis of various facets of Ger­man Cinema, drawing on classic films from Fritz Lang to Wim Wenders. We’ll look at 10 movies and see what, as cultural docu­ments, they reveal of German history, society and “Zeitgeist” from the 1920s till today.

GER 355 course flyer

 

Spring 2021

German & swedish language Courses

GER 103 First Year German (5 credits)
CRNs: 32483, 32484, 32485, 32486. This series is designed to provide you with a foundation in German language and culture: you will learn to communicate in German using the four skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading. Through videos, readings and class discussions you will be introduced to various aspects of culture in German-speaking countries. 101-103 are structured according to international standards (ACTFL and EFR proficiency guidelines) to provide you with transparency and clear goals and to signal to you, other universities, and employers around the world that you have mastered basic German.

GER 203 Second Year German (4 Credits)
CRNs: 32487, 32488. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement. This is the sixth quarter of a two-year sequence designed to provide you with a foundation in German vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In German 203, you will have the chance to expand your vocabulary and your knowledge of structures in a unifying context with engaging cultural topics brought to you in authentic readings and engaging videos. You will learn to discuss in German and continue to prepare for participating in the larger academic and intellectual discourses at the University of Oregon and beyond.

SWED 203 Second Year Swedish (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 35242. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters (A&L) requirement. Review of grammar, composition, and conversation. Readings from contemporary texts in Swedish.

GER 313 Intermediate Language Training (4 credits) Hoeller
CRN: 32496. This course satisfies one Arts and Letters requirement.  Extensive practice in speaking and writing German, and complex grammatical structures in writing.

SWED 405 Third Year Swedish (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 35243.

literature & culture courses

an image of a german boy walking awayGER 223 Germany: A Multicultural Society (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 32490 + Discussion, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L); Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP); and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Examines the multiethnic complexities of German, Austrian, and/or Swiss societies through the writings of African, Turkish, or Jewish Germans as well as contemporary films on the topic. This course introduces students to the political and social challenges faced by post-unification Germany.

Picture of Euro coins and billsGER 250 The Culture of Money (4 credits) Klebes
CRN: 36046, taught in EnglishThis course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. This course presents a concise intellectual history of German-speaking culture from the 16th century to the 19th century that puts a primary focus on economic thinking. Through a combination of broader historical readings, close readings of literary and philosophical texts, and an analysis of visual art and music, we will trace the development of religion, science, literature, art, and philosophy during this time.

Moomin illustrationSCAN 325 Constructions versus Constrictions of Identity: Scandinavian Children’s Literature (4 credits) Howard
CRN: 36049, taught in English. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L); Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance (IP); and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. This course introduces students to the study of children’s literature from the countries of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland. We will begin by examining the origins of Scandinavian children’s literature in early folk and fairytales and trace its evolution through the nineteenth and twentieth century in stories and picture books up to the present. We will read works by some of the most well-known children’s book authors to come out of the Nordic countries, including Astrid Lindgren, Tove Jansson, Elsa Beskow, Hans Christian Andersen, Selma Lagerlöf, and Sven Nordqvist. Students will be introduced to theoretical readings in the study of children’s literature, and we will examine these stories in their historical, pedagogical, and social contexts. The emphasis of the course will be on analysis and interpretation of these texts and how they reflect the child’s changing position in society with regard to ethnicity, gender, and power constellations. We will also pay particular attention to how children’s literature has re-imagined fairy tale structures and motifs, and how supernatural figures like elves, trolls, and mermaids are transformed throughout Scandinavian children’s literature.

Classic German still life food paintingGER/SCAN 345M Food, Culture, and Identity in Germany and Scandinavia (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 36050/36051. The language of communication for German 345 is English and knowledge of German is not required. For German majors, there will be discussions in German following the regular class meetings. German majors will read primary course literature in German and write papers in German as well. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Food and life experiences are inextricably linked. Through interdisciplinary readings, lectures, films, and discussions, this comparative course will examine the relationship between food and identity in literature, culture, and business. We will examine the ways in which German literature uses food to represent and understand the human experience. We will discuss the various symbolic functions of food associated with images of cooking, eating, drinking, and feasting as presented in literary works and popular culture. Class discussion will be supplemented by the viewing of films about food and eating, and by the reading of secondary-critical material that will help us to frame our discussions of food in literature while expanding toward contemporary food issues (sustainability, food security, ethnicity, national identity, etc.).

Illustration of a grassy pathGER 356 German Fairy Tales (4 credits) Ostmeier
CRN: 36048, taught in English and offered remotely or hyflex class options. This course satisfies the Arts and Letters (A&L), International Cultures (IC), and Global Perspectives (GP) requirements. Approved Folklore requirement for FLRP category. The study of fairy tales is closely linked to controversial debates about the complex aesthetic, philosophical and social connotations of fantasy. We will examine the transitions from magic to uncanny, surrealist, and fantasy tales from Romanticism, especially the Grimms, to visual cultures of the 21st century. Creative and analytical assignments will address the fluid borders between our fictive and concrete realities. Additional optional discussion in German for interested students.

GER 407 Sem: Nietzsche and Mbembe: Morality, Ressentiment, and Delirium (4 credits) Stern
CRN: 32502. Photo of Friedrich Nietzche and Achille MmembeThe premise of this course is simple. We will read two books, Friedrich Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals and Achille Mbembe’s Critique of Black Reason. We will focus on establishing a conversation between these two thinkers and analyze the way Nietzsche’s delineation of the violent origins of moral systems in the west, and his postulation that the human being has never known any system of meaning free of an internalization of that violence (ressentiment) interacts with Mbembe’s analysis of the parameters of a racially inflected system of reason born from the intellectual underpinning of European colonial project. We will salt our primary sources with some excerpts from Nietzsche’s notebooks and aphorisms, an essay on naming by Ngugi wa Thiong’o, and Frantz Fanon’s essay on violence. Foci for our analysis are relational and not static in their conception. They include but are not confined to: naming, classification and morality, the Black Atlantic and the multiplicity of Modernity, the conflation of Modernity, Colonialism, and Epistemicide, and the relation between “Race,” Delirium, and Illusion.  In other words, this class resides on the borderline between Western rationality and its “other.” There are no prerequisites for this class save for an open mind. The class will be taught in English although students with the ability to read in Nietzsche in German or Mbembe in French are welcome to do so.

GER 409 Prac German Teaching (4 credits over 2 terms) Vogel
CRN: 32504. In collaboration with Eugene public schools, the Department of German and Scandinavian is excited to offer a German-teaching internship program for dedicated undergraduate majors or minors in German who enjoy working with children and possess a high proficiency in the language. GER 409 students employ new and fun driven teaching approaches in settings from preschool through sixth grade levels, and will act as ambassadors for GERSCAN working towards our mission of promoting global citizenship across all curriculums. The program will run through both Winter and Spring terms of 2021. In order to prepare for the assignment, students will receive preparatory training during the Winter Term, followed by 4-5 weeks of teaching during Spring Term, and around the sixth week students will present a report about their teaching experiences. Over two terms, students are expected to earn 4 total credits. This course counts towards Gerscan Major programs as a language course and/or SLAT certificate.

Masks illustrationGER 425 Play Performance: Masse Mensch (4 credits) Vogel
CRN: 36047, taught in German. In this course we read, analyze, and perform live excerpts from a German language play. We will do this at the example of Ernst Toller’s play Man and the Masses (Masse Mensch), a seminal play from the 1920s. We emphasize correct pronunciation and intonation. German majors and minors will receive language or literature credits. Anybody can participate, either on stage/on screen or on the production side of things.